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Results: listing 1 - 6 of 34 for “Banks”

Central bank calendar — 2019

• Federal Reserve
• European Central Bank
• Bank of England
• Riksbank
• Norges Bank
• Bank of Japan
• Swiss National Bank
• Reserve Bank of Australia
• Reserve Bank of New Zealand
• Bank of Canada

Kiran Sakaria, Junior Strategist | kisa02@handelsbanken.se

Central bank calendar — 2018

• Federal Reserve
• European Central Bank
• Bank of England
• Riksbank
• Norges Bank
• Bank of Japan
• Swiss National Bank
• Reserve Bank of Australia
• Reserve Bank of New Zealand
• Bank of Canada

Kiran Sakaria, Junior Strategist | kisa02@handelsbanken.se

Swedish Rate Wrap — Brighter prospects for the European banking sector

The banking sector in the eurozone has long been struggling with structural problems. A high proportion of non-performing loans, low capitalisation and bank-specific trouble spots have hampered lending operations. A solution is now close at hand for the Italian bank Monte Dei Paschi, while the Spanish problem bank Banco Popular has been taken over. The sector as a whole is also moving in the right direction and the economic recovery in the eurozone is providing support. 

UK Next Week's Agenda and Wrap Up — January 22, 2016

- Headlines for the UK economy and global highlights
- Wrap up, January 18-22
- Next week's agenda, January 25-29
- Financial overview, government bond yields and financial forecasts
- The economy: Sterling volatility to continue   
- News and statements during the week

Macro Comment Eurozone — Corporate credit growth turns negative again

According to the latest bank lending survey for the ECB, conditions for lending to enterprises have improved as an easing of credit standards was reported. "Competition continues to drive banks' easing of credit standards on loans to enterprises, while banks' cost of funds and balance sheet constraints and banks' risk perceptions also contributed to the easing." - ECB Bank Lending Survey, October 2015.

Macro Comment Norway — We expect Norges Bank to cut its policy rate this week

Indications are clear that the economy is slowing more than what Norges Bank has factored in. A broad set of labour market indicators also point to faster acceleration in unemployment, relative to the Bank's estimates. Also, the underlying inflation pressure is weaker. Finally, the krone has appreciated, and the import-weighted NOK is now stronger than what the Bank has forecast. Thus, we expect Norges Bank to cut its policy rate at this week's meeting. However, we must stress the uncertainty; consensus expects no change.

Marius Gonsholt Hov, Senior Economist | maho60@handelsbanken.no